Flynn told Mueller people tied to Trump and Congress tried to obstruct probe

Former national security adviser Michael Flynn told investigators that people linked to the Trump administration and Congress reached out to him in an effort to interfere in the Russia probe, according to newly-unredacted court papers filed Thursday.

The communications could have “affected both his willingness to cooperate and the completeness of that cooperation,” special counsel Robert Mueller wrote in the court filings.
Flynn even provided a voicemail recording of one such communication, the court papers say. “In some instances, the SCO was unaware of the outreach until being alerted to it by the defendant,” Mueller wrote.

No other details were provided in the filing, but the Mueller report noted that President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer left a voicemail message for Flynn in late November 2017 that addressed the possibility of him cooperating with the government.
“[I]t wouldn’t surprise me if you’ve gone on to make a deal with … the government,” the attorney said in the voicemail message, according to Mueller.
[I]f… there’s information that implicates the President, then we’ve got a national security issue, . . . so, you know, . . . we need some kind of heads up. Um, just for the sake of protecting all our interests if we can …. [R]emember what we’ve always said about the President and his feelings toward Flynn and, that still remains.”
Flynn’s lawyer Robert Kelner did not immediately return a request for comment. The White House also did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Flynn pleaded guilty in December 2017 to a charge of lying to the FBI about his conversations with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak in the weeks before Trump took office. He faces up to six months in prison. A judge has yet to set a sentencing date.
Mueller’s office had previously told the court that Flynn should receive little to no jail time due to his “substantial assistance” in the special counsel’s investigation into Russian election interference.
Mueller wrapped up the probe in March, concluding that there was no proof Trump or a member of his campaign conspired with Russia. But the special counsel declined to make a judgement on whether Trump obstructed justice.
Attorney General William Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein determined that there was insufficient evidence to pursue the matter further.

Per: NBC News

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