NYC could see warmer than average winter, weather models say!!

New York City could be in for a warmer than average winter, even as parts of Upstate New York get hit with more snow than usual.

Forecasters from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Predication Center released an updated winter outlook for the country on Thursday.

Meteorologists predicted that La Niña — a global weather pattern influenced by colder temperatures in the Pacific Ocean — in will be in effect for the third straight winter.

The phenomenon is expected to bring colder weather to the Northwestern region of the country and the western Great Lakes, but there is a 33-40% chance that air in the tri-state area and along the coastal Northeast would be warmer than average, according to the outlook.

New York City could be in for a warmer than average winter, even as parts of Upstate New York get hit with more snow than usual.
New York City could be in for a warmer than average winter, even as parts of Upstate New York get hit with more snow than usual.

NOAA predicts that New York’s downstate region has an “equal chance” of getting more or less snow than average, but a large swatch of the western and central part of the state has a 33-40% of having an especially snowy winter. The odds of the Buffalo region seeing more snow than usual are up to 50%, according to the models.

New York City receives an average of 30 inches of snow per winter. Last year, predictions that La Niña would bring more powder to the city came to fruition, as 37 inches fell in Central Park, according to government statistics.

Meteorologists predicted that La Niña -- a global weather pattern influenced by colder temperatures in the Pacific Ocean -- in will be in effect for the third straight winter.
Meteorologists predicted that La Niña — a global weather pattern influenced by colder temperatures in the Pacific Ocean — in will be in effect for the third straight winter.
Man jumping over slush onto NYC sidewalk
New York City receives an average of 30 inches of snow per winter. Last year, predictions that La Niña would bring more powder to the city came to fruition.
A snow plow clears the snow covered road in Washington, DC on January 3, 2022.
A snow plow clears the snow covered road in Washington, DC on January 3, 2022.
Snow plow
“NOAA’s new supercomputers are enabling us to develop even better, more detailed forecast capabilities, which we’ll be rolling out in the coming years.”

“The hardworking forecasters at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center produce timely and accurate seasonal outlooks and short-term forecasts year-round,” said Michael Farrar, Ph.D., director of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction.

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“NOAA’s new supercomputers are enabling us to develop even better, more detailed forecast capabilities, which we’ll be rolling out in the coming years.”

Per: NYP

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